Scholars

Photo of Mark Cooper

Mark Cooper

University of California, Davis
United States
Email mhcooper [at] ucdavis [period/dot] edu

Mark Cooper is an Assistant Professor at the University of California, Davis. His research examines the politics and governance of climate change, particularly in agriculture and land use. His work engages concepts and theories from political ecology, geographical political economy, science and technology studies, and environmental sociology to understand and transform the use of metrics, valuation, and policy instruments for climate change mitigation. Mark’s current research analyzes the concept and practice of “climate-smart agriculture” as a multifaceted strategy for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from livestock, and the effect of climate investments on rural land use and land tenure.

Publications

John Chung-En Liu and Mark H. Cooper. 2020. “Carbon Markets and International Environmental Governance.” In The Cambridge Handbook of Environmental Sociology (eds. Katharine Legun, Julie C. Keller, Michael Carolan, and Michael M. Bell), 267–284. Cambridge University Press.

Harriet Bulkeley, Mark H. Cooper, and Johannes Stripple. 2019. “Encountering climate’s new governance.” In A Research Agenda for Global Environmental Politics (eds. Peter Dauvergne and Justin Alger), 137–148. Edward Elgar.

Mark H. Cooper. 2017. “Open Up and Say “Baa”: Examining the Stomachs of Ruminant Livestock and the Real Subsumption of Nature.” Society & Natural Resources 30 (7): 812–828.

Mark H. Cooper. 2015. “Measure for measure? Commensuration, commodification, and metrology in emissions markets and beyond.” Environment and Planning A 47 (9): 1787–1804.

Christopher Rosin and Mark H. Cooper. 2015. “Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from livestock: complications, implications, and new political ecologies.” In Political Ecologies of Meat (eds. Jody Emel and Harvey Neo), 315–328. Routledge.

Mark H. Cooper and Christopher Rosin. 2014. “Absolving the sins of emission: The politics of regulating agricultural greenhouse gas emissions in New Zealand.” Journal of Rural Studies 36: 391–400.

Mark H. Cooper, Jonathan Boston, and John Bright. 2013. “Policy challenges for livestock emissions abatement: lessons from New Zealand.” Climate Policy 13 (1): 110–133.